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There are 153 names in this directory beginning with the letter O.
O2

Object-Oriented. An object-oriented database language.

OAB

One-to-All Broadcast.

Oberon

A procedural programming language which evolved from Modula-2.

object

In object-oriented design or programming, a data item with instructions for the operations to be performed on it.

object code

Machine code generated from source code by an assembler or compiler.

object computer

1. The computer that receives a communication, such as a fax or modem transmission. 2. The computer into which a program from a source computer is loaded and run.

object linking and embedding

(OLE). A way of connecting a file with objects from other applications. For example, a page layout file could have a spreadsheet chart, a word processing file, and a graphics file included. An embedded object becomes part of the document in which it is embedded, and is no longer linked to the source document. A linked object is displayed in the destination document but remains in the source document; when a change is made in a linked object, all files connected with it are automatically updated.

object linking and embedding custom cont

(OCX). A special-purpose program module that can be used by applications in a Windows environment. Examples of functions handled by OCX are scroll bars and the ability to resize windows. OCX controls superseded VBX controls, which were written in Visual Basic. OCX controls have been superseded by ActiveX controls; however, ActiveX is backward compatible with OCX. OCX control files end with the .OCX extension.

Object Lisp

An object-oriented version of the Lisp programming language.

Object Management Group

(OMG). An international consortium that sets standards for object-oriented programming.

object management system

In an Integrated Project Support Environment, the system that maintains information about the software being developed.

object program

A program that has been translated from the source language in which it was written into machine language, which can be executed by the computer.

Object Request Broker

(ORB). A program that controls the communication between a client and an object on a server. ORB is a standard of the Object Management Group (OMG).

object technology

(OT). Software development using objects as components with which to build applications.

object-oriented

(OO). Having to do with or making use of objects; an object in this sense is a component containing both data and instructions for the operations to be performed on that data. In object-oriented programming, these reusable components are linked together in various ways to create applications.

object-oriented database

(OODB). A database in which data is stored as objects in an object-oriented programming environment, and which is managed by an object-oriented database management system.

object-oriented graphics

Graphic images represented in the computer as instructions to draw lines or objects, rather than as bitmaps. Also called vector graphics.

object-oriented interface

A graphical user interface such as in Macintosh, Windows or Motif.

object-oriented programming

(OOP). An approach to programming in which each data item with the operations used on it is designated as an object; the routines used to operate on the data item are called methods; and objects are grouped in a hierarchy of classes, with each class inheriting characteristics from the class above it. Some uses of object-oriented programming are simulation; work with vectors and other mathematical objects; and work with graphic objects. Examples of object-oriented programming languages are SIMULA, Smalltalk, C++, Object Pascal, Objective C, Oblog, Eiffel, ESP, ACTOR, and Loops.

object-oriented programming language

A language used in object-oriented programming.

Objective C

An object-oriented C programming language released in slightly different versions by Stepstone, NeXT and GNU. It is available for MS-DOS, Macintosh, VAX/VMS and UNIX.

Objective PASCAL

An extension of PASCAL which has object-oriented programming features.

OBKB

An ackronym to be used while in real-time chat; it means “Okay, bye bye.”

oblique stroke

ASCII character 47: / .

obliqueness

In typography, the degree to which type slants, either to the right or left. Italic fonts have a built-in slant; some programs allow the user to slant type, determining the direction and degree.

OCR

Optical Character Recognition. The ability of a computer to recognize characters optically. OCR programs are used with scanners to enter text into the computer when there is already a hardcopy version. A page of text scanned with OCR does not read as a graphics file, the way other scanned images do. It can be edited and formatted just like any other text file. Text scanned with OCR will lose some of its formatting, and when a letter is indistinct, the program will guess, so typos can creep in. Some OCR programs can recognize handwritten characters.

octal

Base-8 notation. Octal numbers use only the digits 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; the second column to the left is the 8s place. For example, 36 octal is 6 ones and 3 eights, or 30 decimal. Octal notation can be used as a shortcut for representing six-bit binary characters by converting each three bits into one octal digit, this way: 011 010 binary = 32 octal = 26 decimal.

octet

Eight bits. Octet is sometimes used instead of the term byte to avoid confusion, because not all computer systems use bytes that are eight bits long.

octillion

10^27 (U.S. and Canada); 10^48 (Europe).

octodecillion

10^57 (U.S. and Canada); 10^108 (Europe).

octothorpe

ASCII character 35: # . Also called hash mark or number sign.

OCX

Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) Custom Control. A special-purpose program module that can be used by applications in a Windows environment. Examples of functions handled by OCX are scroll bars and the ability to resize windows. OCX controls superseded VBX controls, which were written in Visual Basic. OCX controls have been superseded by ActiveX controls; however, ActiveX is backward compatible with OCX. OCX control files end with the .OCX extension.

ODA

Open Document Architecture. An ISO standard for documents which allows for the transfer of text, graphics, and facsimiles between platforms.

ODBC

Open DataBase Connectivity. An interface that makes it possible to access different database systems with a common language. ODBC is based on CLI (Call Level Interface); there are ODBC drivers and development tools for Windows, Macintosh, UNIX, and OS/2.

odd parity

A form of error checking of transmitted data in which a parity bit is 1 when there is an odd number of 1 bits in the byte.

Ode

An object-oriented database from AT&T.

OEM

Original Equipment Manufacturer. A company that manufactures a product and sells it to a reseller. OEM can also refer to the reseller itself in the sense that resellers are “OEM customers.” As customers, they either add value to the product prior to reselling it, label it privately, or bundle it with their own products.

OEM character set

The extended ASCII character set of the IBM PC, used with DOS and some Windows fonts.

OEM font

A font that uses the OEM character set.

Oersted

The unit of magnetic intensity in the centimeter-gram-second system. Named for Hans Christian Oersted, Danish physicist (1777-1851).

off hook

(OH). A modem status signal indicated by a light on the modem, which means the local modem can send but not receive transmissions. This is equivalent to having a telephone off the hook.

off-site storage

Files stored in a separate location from the main data library; this provides an extra copy in case of fire or theft.

OfficeJet

A Hewlett-Packard inkjet printer, copier and fax machine all in one unit.

offline

Not online. Not connected to the computer and turned on (said of peripheral devices); or not connected to a computer network.

offline browser or off-line browser

A program that can be used to download email or other material from an online service, which can be read later, offline. This kind of software can save money for people who pay for by the hour for online services.

offline reader or off-line reader

A program that can be used to download email or other material from an online service, which can be read later, offline. This kind of software can save money for people who pay for by the hour for online services.

offline storage

External storage on disks and tapes.

offline world

The world that exists outside the online world of computers and networks.

offload

To remove data from a computer and put it on another computer or storage medium.

OFX

Open Financial Exchange. An open specification for online transfer of financial data, combining Microsoft's Open Financial Connectivity, Intuit's OpenExchange, and CheckFree's electronic banking and payment protocols. OFE can directly connect customers with their financial institutions, and can be used for such transactions as downloading bank and credit card statements; transferring funds; making payments; and billing. OFX is based upon SGML, and is designed to be easy to learn and extensible.

OH

Off Hook. A modem status signal indicated by a light on the modem, which means the local modem can send but not receive transmissions. This is equivalent to having the telephone off the hook.

ohm

A unit of electrical resistance; the resistance of a conductor in which a potential difference of one volt produces a current of one ampere. Named after Georg Simon Ohm, German physicist (1787-1854).

Ohm, Georg Simon

The German physicist (1787-1854) whose name is used for the unit of electrical resistance (ohm). See Ohm’s law.

Ohm's Law

A law which describes the way electricity works: I = V/R where I = current, in amperes; V = voltage, in volts; and R = resistance, in ohms.

OIW

OSI Implementors Workshop.

OLAP

OnLine Analytical Processing. A method of database indexing that enhances quick access to data, especially in queries calling for large quantities of data or viewing the data from many different aspects.

OLE

Object Linking and Embedding. A way of connecting a file with objects from other applications. For example, a page layout file could have a spreadsheet chart, a word processing file, and a graphics file included. An embedded object becomes part of the document in which it is embedded, and is no longer linked to the source document. A linked object is displayed in the destination document but remains in the source document; when a change is made in a linked object, all files connected with it are automatically updated.

OLE custom control

(OCX). A special-purpose program module that can be used by applications in a Windows environment. Examples of functions handled by OCX are scroll bars and the ability to resize windows. OCX controls superseded VBX controls, which were written in Visual Basic. OCX controls have been superseded by ActiveX controls; however, ActiveX is backward compatible with OCX. OCX control files end with the .OCX extension.

Olivetti

An Italian company which produces computers, office machines, and printers.

OLTP

On-Line Transaction Processing. Real-time processing of transactions on the computer.

OMF

Weather Observation Markup Format. An application of XML used to encode weather observation reports, forecasts, and advisories.

OMG

Object Management Group. An international consortium that sets standards for object-oriented programming.

OML

Ontology Markup Language. An evolution of Simple HTML Ontology Extensions (SHOE) to Extensible Markup Language (XML).

omnidirectional

In all directions.

OmniPage

Optical character recognition software from Caere Corporation, Los Gatos, California, available for PC and Macintosh.

OMR

Optical Mark Reader. A scanning device that can read marks such as pencil marks on a page; used to read forms and multiple-choice questionnaires.

on hook

Not off hook; said of a telephone line available to receive incoming calls.

on-line

Information which does not need a modem to be accessed. See also on-line help, contrast with online

on-line help

Help available on the computer; for example, explanations about features of an application which is available within the application; or support accessible via network.

on-line transaction processing

(OLTP). Real-time processing of transactions on the computer.

on-site service

Service where the computer is installed, instead of having to bring the computer into a shop or ship the computer back to the manufacturer for repairs.

on-the-fly printer

A kind of impact printer that prints in a way that the type slugs do not stop moving during the time it is making an impression.

one time programmable read only memory

(OTPROM). A kind of PROM that can only be programmed once.

one-off

One at a time; for example, a CD-ROM recorder can only write one CD-ROM at a time.

online

1. Connected to the Internet or other online service that demands the use of a modem by the user; or, referring to a user who has an account which gives access to the Internet or other online service . 2. Connected to the computer (said of peripherals) 3. Connected to a computer network. Contrast with on-line.

OnLine Analytical Processing

(OLAP). A method of database indexing that enhances quick access to data, especially in queries calling for large quantities of data or viewing the data from many different aspects.

online service

A computer network accessed by modem. Online services generally charge a monthly fee, and offer such services as e-mail, information services, online shopping, news, games. Some examples are Delphi, Prodigy, America Online, MCI Mail, and CompuServe.

Ontology Markup Language

(OML). An evolution of Simple HTML Ontology Extensions (SHOE) to Extensible Markup Language (XML).

OO

Object oriented or object-oriented. Having to do with or making use of objects; an object in this sense is a component containing both data and instructions for the operations to be performed on that data. In object-oriented programming, these reusable components are linked together in various ways to create applications.

OOC

Out Of Character. A term used in online role-playing games. A player can go out of character in order to ask questions about the game, talk to game administrators, and so forth. The game is played while IC (In Character), that is, assuming the role of the character in the game.

OODB

Object-Oriented Data Base. A database in which data is stored as objects in an object-oriented programming environment, and which is managed by an object-oriented database management system.

OOGL

Object-Oriented Graphics Language.

OOP

Object-Oriented Programming. An approach to programming in which each data item with the operations used on it is designated as an object; the routines used to operate on the data item are called methods; and objects are grouped in a hierarchy of classes, with each class inheriting characteristics from the class above it. Some uses of object-oriented programming are simulation; work with vectors and other mathematical objects; and work with graphic objects. Examples of object-oriented programming languages are SIMULA, Smalltalk, C++, Object Pascal, Objective C, Oblog, Eiffel, ESP, ACTOR, and Loops.

Open DataBase Connectivity

(ODBC). An interface that makes it possible to access different database systems with a common language. ODBC is based on CLI (Call Level Interface); there are ODBC drivers and development tools for Windows, Macintosh, UNIX, and OS/2.

Open Document Architecture

(ODA). An ISO standard for documents which allows for the transfer of text, graphics, and facsimiles between platforms.

Open Financial Exchange

(OFX). An open specification for online transfer of financial data, combining Microsoft’s Open Financial Connectivity, Intuit’s OpenExchange, and CheckFree’s electronic banking and payment protocols. OFE can directly connect customers with their financial institutions, and can be used for such transactions as downloading bank and credit card statements; transferring funds; making payments; and billing. OFX is based upon SGML, and is designed to be easy to learn and extensible.

Open Look

A graphical user interface for UNIX from Sun and AT&T.

Open Shortest Path First

(OSPF). An interior gateway protocol that routes messages according to the least expensive path, developed to replace the RIP protocol.

Open Software Description format

(OSD format). A vocabulary based on Extensible Markup Language (XML), used for describing software packages and how they interrelate.

Open source Initiative

This non-profit corporation is found at opensource.org, and exists to promote the open source software format as a better alternative than existing software development methods.

Open Systems Interconnection

(OSI; also called Open Systems Interconnect). A model developed by ISO (International Organization for Standardization) to allow computer systems made by different vendors to communicate with each other. The goal of OSI is to create a worldwide open systems networking environment where all systems can interconnect. Most communications protocols today are based on the OSI model. OSI defines a framework for communications which has seven layers: 1-the physical layer, 2-the data link layer, 3-the network layer, 4-the transport layer, 5-the session layer, 6-the presentation layer, 7-the application layer. Control is passed from one layer to the next. A communication begins with the application layer on one end (for example, a user opening an application and typing a request). The communication is passed through each of the seven layers down to the physical layer (which is the actual transmission of bits). On the receiving end, control passes back up the hierarchy. See physical layer, data link layer, network layer, transport layer, session layer, presentation layer, application layer.

open-source software

(OSS). Software in which the program source code is openly shared with developers and users. Benefits of OSS are that developers can customize programs, and these innovations, in turn, are shared within the programming community so that everyone learns from each other. OSS is a concept that embraces many hardware platforms and software languages; Linux is one popular example. Two Web sites (www.opensource.org and www.mozilla.org) aim to bring together professional and amateur developers from around the world, in the hope that new technology will blossom in an OSS environment.

OpenMLS

(Open Multiple Listing Service). Software based on the XML standard, designed to improve real estate listing services on the World Wide Web.

operand

An entity on which an operation is performed, or a reference to data to be operated on.

operating system

(OS). The main control program of a computer that schedules tasks, manages storage, and handles communication with peripherals. Its main part, called the kernel, is always present. The operating system presents a basic user interface when no applications are open, and all applications must communicate with the operating system.

operating systems

(OS). An operating system is the main control program of a computer that schedules tasks, manages storage, and handles communication with peripherals. An operating system presents a basic user interface when no applications are open, and all applications must communicate with the operating system. Some computers can switch between operating systems (see dual boot) or run another operating system under emulation. Examples of operating systems are Windows, DOS, MacOS, Linux, UNIX, OS/2, RISC OS, etc.

opt-in mailing list

A mailing list that adds members only upon request.

opt-out mailing list

A mailing list that adds members without their request, but gives each member the option to request that his or her name be removed. The main problem with remove requests is that most of them are not honored, but are simply used to confirm that the email address is valid. The list will in this case continue to send mail to the user and may sign the user up for still more mailing lists.

optical character recognition

(OCR). The ability of a computer to recognize characters optically. OCR programs are used with scanners to enter text into the computer when there is already a hardcopy version. A page of text scanned with OCR does not read as a graphics file, the way other scanned images do. It can be edited and formatted just like any other text file. Text scanned with OCR will lose some of its formatting, and when a letter is indistinct, the program will guess, so typos can creep in. Some OCR programs can recognize handwritten characters.

optical chip

Integrated optical chips are a technology in development. The proposed chips would use light rather than electrical current, generate little or no heat, make faster switching possible, and be immune to electrical noise.

optical disc

A disk in which light is the medium used to record and read data. The disk is made of clear polycarbonate plastic, covered with a layer of dye, a thin layer of gold which reflects the laser beam, and a protective layer over that. A recording is made by sending pulses from a laser beam which make a pattern in the layer of dye. The recording is read later by directing a laser beam at the disk and interpreting the pattern of reflected light. CDs, CD-ROMs, and videodiscs, are commercially recorded optical disks and are not rewritable. Recordable optical disks include WORM (write once read many) disks, and CD-Rs (CD-recordables), which can be written only once; and CD-Es (CD-erasables) which can be rewritten many times.

optical fiber

The thin glass filament that makes up fiber-optic cable. Light pulses sent along the optical fibers carry digital information at high speeds.

optical mark reader

(OMR). A scanning device that can read marks such as pencil marks on a page; used to read forms and multiple-choice questionnaires.

optical memory

Memory stored in a optical medium such as a CD-ROM, and read with a laser beam.

optical mouse

A mouse that senses where it is by emitting a light which bounces off a special reflective mouse pad.

optical reader

An input device that uses light to recognize bar codes and typed or printed characters and convert them into digital codes.

optical resolution

Most often used when referring to optical scanners or digital camerals, optical resolution is the visible, or physical, resolution at which a given device captures an image. Optical resolution is measured in dots per inch (dpi). Contrast with interpolated resolution.

optical scanner

A device that uses light to read patterns, and may then convert the patterns into digital or analog signals. An optical scanner used as an input device for a computer can scan a picture or page of text and convert it into digital code as a graphics or text file on the computer. There are flatbed scanners which look like photocopiers, having a glass scanning surface to put the original on; sheetfed scanners in which the original is guided across the scanner; and handheld scanners which the user has to move across the area being scanned. See also bar code scanner, optical reader, optical character recognition.

Optical Storage Technology Association

(OSTA). An organization of optical drive manufacturers that sets standards for optical media in computing.

optimization

A series of operations that can be performed periodically to keep a computer in optimum shape. Optimization is done by running a maintenance check, scanning for viruses, and defragmenting the hard disk. Norton Utilities is one program used for optimizing.

optimize

To bring a computer into optimum shape by running a maintenance check, scanning for viruses, and defragmenting the hard disk. Norton Utilities is one program used for optimizing.

option buttons

Buttons used for selecting options in interactive forms; only one can be chosen at a time. If an option button is selected by clicking on it, all the other buttons are automatically deselected. Also called radio buttons because they work like the buttons on old-fashioned radios.

option key

A key on a Macintosh keyboard that extends the keyboard range to special characters, such as accents, copyright and trademark symbols, etc., and that is also used in some keyboard commands.

OQL

Outgoing Quality Level.

OR

A Boolean operation which is true if any one of its inputs (0, 1 or true, false) is true. An exclusive OR is true if one of the inputs is true, but not both. See also Boolean algebra, Boolean operators, AND, and NOT.

OR gate

A Boolean logic gate used in computer arithmetic. The OR gate has an output of 1 if one of its inputs is 1.

Oracle

A relational database management system for many computer platforms from Oracle Corporation, Redwood Shores, California.

Oracle 9

The Oracle 9 is produced by the Oracle corporation in CA. The Oracle 9 is a version of the relation database management system that stores data in related tables so the database is viewed in a variety of ways.

Oracle Corporation

A Redwood Shores, California software company that created the Oracle database management system and other software products for computers from PDAs to mainframes.

Oracle Rdb

A relational database for the Digital VAX series and other computers, originally Rdb from Digital Equipment Corporation, now owned by Oracle Corporation.

Orange Book

The U.S. government document presenting standards for secure computing architectures.

ORB

Object Request Broker. A program that controls the communication between a client and an object on a server. ORB is a standard of the Object Management Group (OMG).

ordinate

The y coordinate on an x,y graph (x is the abscissa).

orientation

The direction in which a page is turned for layout and printing; the two possible orientations for letter-size paper are landscape (wide) and portrait (tall).

original equipment manufacturer

(OEM). A company that manufactures a product and sells it to a reseller.

orphan

The first line of a paragraph appearing alone at the bottom of a page, with the rest of the paragraph continuing on the next page. Leaving an orphan line is considered bad style; it is better to have the first two lines of the paragraph, or move the beginning line to the next page.

OS

Operating System. The main control program of a computer that schedules tasks, manages storage, and handles communication with peripherals. Its main part, called the kernel, is always present. The operating system presents a basic user interface when no applications are open, and all applications must communicate with the operating system.

OS/2

A single-user operating system from IBM that can run OS/2, DOS and Microsoft Windows programs and supports Presentation Manager graphical user interface.

OS/2 Warp

Version 3 of OS/2, named “Warp” for “warp speed,” meaning it is fast. It is a PC operating system with a graphical user interface which can run OS/2, DOS, and Windows programs.

OSD

Open Software Description format. A vocabulary based on Extensible Markup Language (XML), used for describing software packages and how they interrelate.

OSI

(Open Systems Interconnection, or Open Systems Interconnect). A model developed by ISO (International Organization for Standardization) to allow computer systems made by different vendors to communicate with each other. The goal of OSI is to create a worldwide open systems networking environment where all systems can interconnect. Most communications protocols today are based on the OSI model. OSI defines a framework for communications which has seven layers: 1-the physical layer, 2-the data link layer, 3-the network layer, 4-the transport layer, 5-the session layer, 6-the presentation layer, 7-the application layer. Control is passed from one layer to the next. A communication begins with the application layer on one end (for example, a user opening an application and typing a request). The communication is passed through each of the seven layers down to the physical layer (which is the actual transmission of bits). On the receiving end, control passes back up the hierarchy. See physical layer, data link layer, network layer, transport layer, session layer, presentation layer, application layer.

OSPF

Open Shortest Path First. An interior gateway protocol that routes messages according to the least expensive path, developed to replace the RIP protocol.

OSR2

A release of Windows 95 with some improvements that were later incorporated in Windows 98. One feature of OSR2 is support for the FAT32 file system.

OSS

Open Source Software. Software in which the program source code is openly shared with developers and users. Benefits of OSS are that developers can customize programs, and these innovations, in turn, are shared within the programming community so that everyone learns from each other. OSS is a concept that embraces many hardware platforms and software languages; Linux is one popular example. Two websites (www.opensource.org and www.mozilla.org) aim to bring together professional and amateur developers from around the world, in the hope that new technology will blossom in an OSS environment.

OSTA

Optical Storage Technology Association. An organization of optical drive manufacturers that sets standards for optical media in computing.

OT

Object Technology. Software development using objects as components with which to build applications.

OTP

The Open Trading Protocol. A worldwide standard for retail trade on the
Internet. The OTP is a set of open standards, freely available to developers and users, built on XML. The OTP standards will create a consistent framework for electronic commerce, which will be easy for consumers to use.

OTPROM

One Time Programmable Read Only Memory. A kind of PROM that can only be programmed once.

outdent

A paragraph in which the first line begins at the left margin, and the rest of the lines are indented. Also called a hanging indent.

outline font

A type font in which a character is defined by a formula describing its outline, rather than as a bitmap. An outline font can also be called a scalable font because it can be scaled to display or print at any size. Examples are TrueType and Type 1 PostScript fonts.

output

Information that comes out of the computer; for example, a picture on the screen, a printed page, sound coming from the speakers, files printed to disk or sent over a communications line.

output area

An area of memory where data is stored until it can be output; also called a buffer.

output device

A peripheral through which information from the computer is communicated to the outside world; for example, a display screen, printer, or speakers.

output devices

Peripheral devices through which information from the computer is communicated to the outside world; for example, the monitor, the printer, or speakers.

outsourcing

Paying an outside contractor to provide certain services which they may specialize in, such as software development.

OverDrive CPU

An Intel Pentium CPU which is designed to replace the older and slower 486 and Pentium CPUs by plugging into the old processor's socket or into an upgrade socket on the motherboard.

overflow

An error condition that results when a numeric value is so large that the number cannot fit in the register or field.

overrun

A condition in which data is lost because the receiving device is not able to accept data at the rate it is transmitted.

overscan

Extending beyond the normal viewing area on the monitor screen.

overstrike

To type over an already-typed character; or, a character that has been overstruck.

overwrite

To write over data that is already on a disk; for example, when updating a file.

overwrite mode

A typing mode in which the characters typed will write over any other characters already on the line; see also insert mode.

Oz-Email

An Internet access provider in Sydney, Australia.

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