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There are 281 names in this directory beginning with the letter T.
T

(Tera-). Trillion; 10^12. Or, 2^40 (1,099,511,627,776). Binary numbers are often used when measuring computer storage.

T-byte

Terabyte. A trillion (10^12) bytes. Or, 2^40 (1,099,511,627,776) bytes. Binary numbers are often used when measuring computer storage.

T1 carrier

A telephone line connection for digital transmission that can handle 24 voice or data channels at 64 kilobits per second, over two twisted pair wires. T1 lines are used for heavy telephone traffic, or for computer networks linked directly to the Internet.

T1 line

A telephone line connection for digital transmission that can handle 24 voice or data channels at 64 kilobits per second, over two twisted pair wires. T1 lines are used for heavy telephone traffic, or for computer networks linked directly to the Internet. T1 lines are normally used by small and medium-sized companies with heavy network traffic. They can send and receive very large text files, graphics, sounds, and databases very quickly. Sometimes referred to as a leased line, a T1 is too large and expensive for individual home use.

T3 carrier

A connection made up of 28 T1 carriers, used to transmit digital signals on fiber-optic cable at 44.736 megabits per second. T3 can handle 672 voice conversations or one video channel.

T3 line

A connection made up of 28 T1 carriers, used to transmit digital signals on fiber-optic cable at 44.736 megabits per second. T3 can handle 672 voice conversations or one video channel. The T3 line has enough bandwidth to transmit full-motion real-time video, and very large databases over a busy network. A T3 line would be installed as a major networking channel for a large corporation or university with high volume network traffic. The backbones of the major Internet service providers are comprised of T3 lines.

TA

ISDN Terminal Adapter. A device that connects a computer to an ISDN channel. It is used instead of a modem, and is either an external unit or a plug-in adapter card. Some terminal adapters have the ability to automatically switch between analog and digital modes.

tab

To hit the tab key or give another command that advances the cursor to the next tab stop. Tab stops are used for tabular material (material that is arranged in a table) to line up text in columns.

tab character

ASCII character 9: Control-I is the character for a horizontal tab. ASCII character 11: Control-K is the character for a vertical tab. The tab character moves the cursor, and any text in front of it, to the next tab stop. It is normally invisible, but certain keyboard commands such as Show Invisibles or command-J will make the hard returns, spaces, and tabs visible on the screen (though they still will not show up in print). In this case, the tabs look like right-facing arrows.

tab clear

A key on a typewriter that is used to clear tab stops.

tab delimited

Having tabs as separators between data elements. For example, in a database or spreadsheet, the tab key can be used to move from one field or cell to the next. The file is tab-delimited (even though the user also has the option to use the mouse to move around). The data from one of these files can be exported into a tab delimited text file.

tab key

A key near the top left of the computer keyboard that is used to move the cursor to a tab stop, from one field to the next in a database, or from cell to cell in a spreadsheet. In some programs, the tab key pressed with the shift key moves in the opposite direction.

tab settings

Settings used in a document to line up text in columns. The tab key is used to move the cursor from one tab stop to the next. In word processing programs, tab settings can be entered by typing in numbers or by clicking on a ruler.

table

1. A presentation of information organized in rows and columns. spreadsheet and database programs provide the best tools for working with tables. A database can show and work with intricate relationships between and among fields and databases. 2. In programming, same as an array.

www.clearinghouse.net).

The Bread Board System

(TBBS). Software which was used for the early Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs), originally coded under CP/M in the early 1980s to run on the Tandy TRS-80 computers and later recoded to run under DOS.

The Open Trading Protocol

(OTP). A worldwide standard for retail trade on the Internet. The OTP is a set of open standards, freely available to developers and users, built on XML. The OTP standards will create a consistent framework for electronic commerce, which will be easy for consumers to use.

The Web

The World Wide Web (WWW). A hypermedia-based system for browsing Internet sites. It is named the Web because it is made of many sites linked together; users can travel from one site to another by clicking on hyperlinks. Text, graphics, sound, and video can all be accessed with browsers like Mosaic, Netscape, or Internet Explorer. The Web can also be accessed with text-only browsers like Lynx.

the wire

Slang term for the Internet.

Theological Markup Language

(ThML). An XML-based markup language for reading books online, specifically theological texts. ThML was created for the Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL).

therblig

The fundamental motions of the hands of a worker. These operations are made up of 17 types of motion: search, select, grasp, reach, move, hold, release, position, pre-position, inspect, assemble, disassemble, use, unavoidable delay, avoidable delay, plan, and test to overcome fatigue. Frank Bunker Gilbreth defined these motions in his system of motion study. (Therblig is Gilbreth spelled backwards).

thin client

A simple client machine or program that performs very little processing. In this client/server arrangement, most of the application processing is done in the (fat) server. For example, a thin client may supply only the graphical interface. The advantage of a thin client is simpler hardware and simpler maintenance; the maintenance for applications is done on the server.

thin film transistor

(TFT). A component of high-performance active matrix LCDs, in which transistors are built into each pixel within the screen.

thin film transistor LCD

(TFT LCD). LCD (liquid crystal display) technology, used for computer screens, in which there is a transistor for each pixel, which prevents losing image quality between scans. Also called active matrix display.

third generation computer

A computer built using integrated circuits. Third-generation computers had small-scale integration and began to be designed after the mid-1960s. During this time period, minicomputers were developed.

third generation language

A high-level language; designed so people could write programs in language easier to understand than assembly language. Examples of third generation languages are BASIC, COBOL, FORTRAN, PASCAL, and C.

Third Party Mail Relay

Third Party Relay occurs when a mail server processes messages that was not sent or received by a local user. In the past, this technique has been used to debug mail connectivity or to go around mail problems. More recently, Third Party Relay has been abused by spammers as they hijack servers to send out their messages. The e-mail appears to have been sent from the hijacked server, even though the server had only acted as a relay point.

ThML

Theological Markup Language. An XML-based markup language for reading books online, specifically theological texts. ThML was created for the Christian Classics Ethereal Library (CCEL).

Thompson, Ken

The original developer of UNIX, at AT&T; it was later developed further by Dennis Ritchie and others.

Thread

1. A series of messages and replies relating to a topic or theme in an email exchange or Internet newsgroup. 2. In programming, a thread is one part of a larger program that can be executed independent of the whole.

thread sled

A World Wide Web browser, or software used for chat or newsgroup messaging.

threaded Internet newsreader

(tin). A newsreader for an Internet newsgroup.

ThreadMark

A popular benchmark made by Adaptec.

Three Tunes

A HyperCard virus that plays three German folk tunes and displays the messages “Hey, what are you doing?” and “Don’t panic.” This virus can cause a system crash.

three-dimensional sound

(3D sound). Sound that seems to come from various directions, creating the effect of a three-dimensional space. 3D sound is used in virtual reality; this effect can be obtained with stereo headphones.

throughput

In computer technology, throughput is the amount of work that a computer can do in a given time period. In data transmission, throughput is the amount of data moved successfully from one place to another in a given time period.

Thumbnail

A miniature dislay of a image or page. Thumbnails are used to allow for fast browsing though multiple images. Clicking on a thumbnail will usually allow the complete image to be viewed on the screen.

THz

Terahertz. One trillion cycles per second.

TI

Texas Instruments. A Dallas, Texas manufacturer of personal computers, semiconductors, and calculators.

TIFF

Tagged Image File Format. A bitmap graphics file format that was developed by Aldus and Microsoft for storing scanned images. It can be used with black and white, gray scale, 8-bit color, and 24-bit color images, and transfers well between different platforms. TIFF images can be compressed using LZW compression or other compression formats.

tilde

ASCII character 126: ~ tilde. Used in some cases to represent a user's home directory. World Wide Web home pages often use the tilde in this form: www.some.com/~jones.

TIM

Telecommunications Interchange Markup (also called Technical Information Markup). An SGML-based markup for communicating information related to telecommunications.

time bomb

A kind of logic bomb that is triggered either on a particular date, or according to the length of time the system or program containing it is in use. It may be triggered once or periodically.

time division multiple access

(TDMA). A multiplexing technology used with satellites and cellular phones, in which multiple channels of data are interleaved (each signal is assigned to a different time interval, and the signals are transmitted by taking turns).

time division multiplexing

(TDM). A multiplexing technique (a way of transmitting two or more signals at the same time over the same communications channel) in which the individual signals are combined by interleaving bits.

time sharing

A computer environment that allows multiple users to work independently at the same time, usually from separate terminals. Time sharing resembles multitasking (one user, many tasks) in that the processor takes turns between the different tasks, giving each task a tiny amount of time, so that it appears the different tasks are running at the same time.

time-sharing

Allowing multiple users to work independently at the same time, usually from separate terminals. Mainframes and minicomputers are usually time-sharing computers.

tin

(threaded Internet newsreader). A newsreader for an Internet newsgroup.

TinyFugue

(TF). A popular UNIX and OS/2 client for MUSH and MUD games.

TM

Test Mode. A modem status signal indicated by a light on the modem, which means the modem is in test mode.

TN

Telnet. A terminal emulation protocol that lets a user log in remotely to other computers on the Internet; it has a command line interface. Originally developed for ARPAnet, Telnet runs on top of the TCP/IP protocol.

Toadie

A virus that first became a problem on the Internet in August 1999. Toadie is a rapid infector that infects a large number of executable files each time it is run. It slows down the infected computer each time it propagates. It also encrypts infected files and corrupts any infected file that is subsequently edited.

token

In the input to a compiler, one of the meaningful units, such as a name, constant, etc. The input is a stream of characters which the lexical analyzer breaks up into a sequence of tokens.

token ring

A local area network in which computers are configured in a ring, and a message called a token is passed from station to station. The token is used to avoid conflicts in transmission; a machine can only transmit messages while it holds the token. The most common type of token ring is defined in the IEEE 802.5 standard.

toner

The black powder which is used in an electrostatic process by laser printers and copy machines to create images on the paper.

tool palette

In a computer graphics program, the tool palette is the collection of tools available to use, such as a paintbrush, charcoal, pencil, paint bucket, airbrush, etc.

toolbar

A vertical or horizontal bar containing icons that represent the commands that can be used in an application. Sometimes the toolbar can be moved around or made to disappear.

ToolBook

A program for Windows from Asymetrix Corporation that uses a visual approach to organizing data, portraying sets of data as pages which can be grouped to make larger sets of data represented as books. ToolBook is similar to HyperCard for Macintosh, which represents data as cards and stacks of cards.

toolbox

A box or grid containing icons that represent the commands that can be used in an application. The toolbox can be moved around or made to disappear. Some programs have several toolboxes for different kinds of tools.

TOOLS

Technology of Object-Oriented Languages and Systems. A conference on objected-oriented languages and systems, organized by Interactive Software Engineering.

top-down design

A way of developing computer programs from the top down, first describing the program actions at a high level, then breaking each instruction down into its elements, which are defined in further detail, until the whole program is complete. Also called stepwise refinement.

topic drift

The tendency for newsgroup or BBS discussions to drift away from the original topic.

topology

Configuration. For example, the topology of a network shows the pattern in which the computers are interconnected. Common network topologies are the star, bus, and Token ring.

TOPS-10

The operating system for the historic DEC PDP-10 computers.

TOS

1. Terms Of Service. A stated list of the terms that must be agreed on by a user of a particular service; the terms under which a service provider provides a particular service. 2. Terms Of Service. To report a violator of America Online's Terms of Service; a user who gets TOSed too many times can lose his or her account.

TOSer

(See TOS). A malicious program whereby a hacker can kick a user off AOL permanently for no reason.

touch typing

Typing without having to look at the keyboard to find the keys. Touch typing is learned by training the fingers to find the keys and having each finger assigned to certain keys. It is much faster than the hunt-and-peck method.

touch typist

A typist who types with all ten fingers, without having to look at the keyboard to find the keys. A touch typist can work much faster than a hunt-and-peck typist.

tower

A tall case that contains the major components of a computer system. It is usually stored on the floor underneath the monitor.

TP0OSI

Transport Protocol Class 0 (Simple Class). The simplest OSI Transport Protocol. It can be used only on top of an X.25 network, or another type of network that does not lose or damage data.

TP4OSI

Transport Protocol Class 4 (Error Detection and Recovery Class). The most powerful OSI Transport Protocol. TP4OSI can be used on top of any type of network, and is the OSI equivalent to TCP.

TR

Terminal Ready. A modem status signal indicated by a light on the modem, which means a communications program is loaded and ready to run.

track

A channel where information is stored on magnetic or optical media. Tracks come in three forms: 1. The concentric rings on a floppy disk or hard disk. Tracks are recorded onto a floppy disk during formatting; a high-density floppy has 160 tracks. Disk storage is organized in tracks and sectors, which are pie-shaped slices. A combination of two or more sectors on a single track makes a cluster or block, the minimum unit used to store information. 2. On CDs and videodiscs, tracks are in spiral form. 3. On magnetic tape, tracks run parallel to the length of the tape, or diagonally for helical scan tracks.

tracks

A channel where information is stored on magnetic or optical media. Tracks come in three forms: 1. The concentric rings on a floppy disk or hard disk. Tracks are recorded onto a floppy disk during formatting; a high-density floppy has 160 tracks. Disk storage is organized in tracks and sectors, which are pie-shaped slices. A combination of two or more sectors on a single track makes a cluster or block, the minimum unit used to store information. 2. On CDs and videodiscs, tracks are in spiral form. 3. On magnetic tape, tracks run parallel to the length of the tape, or diagonally for helical scan tracks.

traffic

The amount of data traveling across a network.

transceiver

Transmitter-receiver. A device that transmits and receives data.

transient

A sudden pulse of extra voltage in a power line, lasting only a fraction of a second, which can cause damage to the computer or its files if there is no surge protector. Also called a spike.

transit network

A network used to route traffic between at least two other networks in addition to carrying its own traffic.

transmission

Sending data over a communications line.

Transmission Control Protocol

(TCP). The most common Internet transport layer protocol, defined in STD 7, RFC 793. This communications protocol is used in networks that follow U.S. Department of Defense standards. It is based on the Internet Protocol as its underlying protocol; TCP/IP means Transmission Control Protocol over Internet Protocol. TCP is connection-oriented and stream-oriented, and provides for reliable communication over packet-switched networks.

Transmission Control Protocol / Internet

(TCP/IP). The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) on top of the Internet Protocol (IP). These protocols were developed by DARPA to enable communication between different types of computers and computer networks. The Internet Protocol is a connectionless protocol which provides packet routing. TCP is connection-oriented and provides reliable communication and multiplexing.

Transmission Control Unit

(TCU). A communications control unit which is operated exclusively by instructions programmed into the computer to which it is connected. It does not have its own internal control programs.

transmit

To send data from one point to another.

transmitter

A device that sends a signal.

transport layer

Layer 4 of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) networking model, which establishes and dissolves connections between hosts and makes sure transmitted data has been received. An example protocol for the transport layer is TCP.

transposition cipher

A way of enciphering a message by arranging the letters in a different order.

trap door

A means of disabling a system's security, by a hardware or software mechanism which is intentionally hidden by designers of the system, often for the purpose of providing access to service technicians or maintenance programmers.

trash can

On a Macintosh, a little picture of a trash can which is used for deleting files. The file's icon is dragged across the desktop and put in the trash. The trash can can also be used to eject floppy disks and CD-ROMs.

trashware

Badly designed or useless software.

Travan cartridge

A magnetic tape cartridge that uses .315″ tape of extended length, which makes it possible to store more data.

Travan drive

A magnetic tape drive that uses .315″ tape of extended length. Travan drives can also read and write QIC Wide tapes.

tredecillion

10^42 (U.S. and Canada); 10^78 (Europe).

trillion

10^12 (U.S. and Canada); 10^18 (Europe).

Trivial File Transfer Protocol

(TFTP). A simpler version of FTP that uses UDP (User Datagram Protocol) rather than TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) for data transport. It is easier to program than FTP but lacks directory and authentication services.

Trojan horse

A program that appears to be useful and harmless but which has harmful side effects such as destroying data or breaking security on the system on which it is run. It is similar to a virus except that it does not propagate itself as a virus does.

TRS

Tandy Radio Shack. The TRS-80 was one of the first microcomputers.

TRS-80

Tandy Radio Shack-80. One of the first personal computers on the market.

TRS-DOS

The operating system of the TRS-80, an early personal computer from Tandy Radio Shack.

Trumpet WinSock

An implementation of Winsock developed by Timothy Tattan, used widely with Windows 3. Web browsers and other programs use Winsock for communication between applications.

TSR

Terminate and Stay Resident. A kind of DOS utility that, once loaded, stays in memory after it is terminated, and can be instantly reactivated by pressing a hotkey or combination of keys. The utility will display on top of the current screen, which will return after exiting the utility. Examples of TSRs are calculators and calendars. Operating systems like Windows and MacOS have the ability to switch back and forth between applications all the time, and to have several windows open with different applications running, so TSRs are not necessary because all the programs function like TSRs.

TTY

Teletypewriter. A device that has a typewriter-style keyboard and built-in printer; it is used to send, receive, and print out signals received over telephone lines.

tub

Computer slang for a slow modem.

tube time

Time spent working at a computer terminal.

Turbo Assembler

(TASM). An MS-DOS assembler from Borland.

Turbo Mouse

A Macintosh trackball made available by Kensington Microware, Ltd.

Turbo software

Software created by Borland International, Inc., including Turbo Pascal, Turbo C, Turbo Prolog, and Borland C++.

Turbogopher

A version of Gopher from the University of Minnesota.

Turtle Beach Systems

A York, Pennsylvania manufacturer of high-quality sound cards. The Multisound card is a Turtle Beach product.

TWAIN

Technology Without An Interesting Name. An open standard interface that makes it possible to capture image data from a scanner or other input device while using a graphics application (such as Photoshop). Most scanners have a TWAIN driver.

TweakUI

A shell extension that works from the computer's control panel, allowing the user to manipulate system settings such as mouse sensitivity, the speed at which menus appear, and the appearance of desktop icons.

twelve-punch

In a Hollerith card, a punch in the top row.

twiddle

To make minor changes in settings and parameters.

twinning

Writing data to more than one tape in a magnetic tape storage system, in case one copy gets damaged.

twip

Twentieth of a Point; 1/20 of a printer's point, same as 1/1440 of an inch.

twisted pair cable

The type of cable used for most telephone wiring. It has pairs of copper wires twisted together, to minimize electrical noise. There are shielded twisted pair (STP) and unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cables. In shielded twisted pair cables, each pair has a metal sheath around it for better protection against interference. Unshielded twisted pair lacks the sheath, but has the advantage of being more flexible and thinner. Twisted pair cable is being replaced over time by coaxial cables and fiber-optic cables, which have greater signal capacity.

twm

Tab Window Manager. A window manager for the X Window System.

two-wire line

A transmission line which has only two wires. An example is the line used for the regular telephone network.

TXD

Transmitting Data. A modem status signal indicated by a light on the modem, which means the local modem is transmitting data.

Type 1 font

The original, highest-quality type of PostScript outline font. Type 1 fonts are designed to print clearly at small sizes on low-resolution machines. Type 1 fonts are scalable to almost any point size because each font is a set of mathematical descriptions of letterforms as Bezier splines. A Type 1 font has two parts: the (bitmapped) screen font and the (outline) printer font. A PostScript interpreter in the printer is used to rasterize the outline font (that is, to translate the outline of each letter into an arrangement of dots, and fill in the outlines) so the type can be printed. Originally Adobe Systems, the originator of PostScript, kept the Type 1 specifications secret; others making PostScript fonts had to make Type 3 fonts, or pay a licensing fee for the Type 1 coding system. Since Adobe made the Type 1 specifications public, most PostScript types created are Type 1 fonts.

Type 2 font

A technology developed by Adobe Systems but never released.

Type 3 font

A type of PostScript font technology that was used a lot before Adobe released the Type 1 specifications publicly. Type 3 fonts can have more elaborate designs than Type 1; for example, shades of gray, graduated fills, and variable stroke widths. But they take up more memory than Type 1 fonts, take longer to print, and do not print well at small sizes.

type ahead

To type faster than the computer can accept the input; most computer programs will allow for a little typing ahead, and will catch up when the typist slows down or stops.

type ball

A metal ball that has raised characters on its surface, used to print the characters onto paper by striking an inked ribbon. Type balls with different fonts can be mounted on the head of a printer or typewriter.

type family

A group of related typefaces that are variations on the same design, such as Helvetica, Helvetica bold, Helvetica italic, Helvetica bold italic.

type font

A complete set of type characters in a particular typeface, typestyle, and size. For example, Times bold, 14 point.

type gauge

An instrument for measuring type size and leading. Often it is a clear sheet of plastic with letters of different point sizes on it, which can be laid on top of a printed page to compare the letters on the page with standard size letters on the see-through gauge. A type gauge usually includes scales of inches, picas, and points for measuring type leading and distances between other design elements on the page. It may also have examples of lines and bullets in various point sizes.

type scaler

Software that changes a scalable font into a bitmap on the spot when needed in order to display the font onscreen or print the characters. TrueType and Adobe Type Manager are examples.

type specifications

Instructions to the typesetter which indicate the desired size, style, and spacing of type on a typeset page.

type specs

Type specifications. Instructions to the typesetter which indicate the desired size, style, and spacing of type on a typeset page.

type style

The styling of the letters of a typeface. For example, the same typeface can be styled as normal, bold, italic, bold italic, underline, strikethrough, outline, shadow, and/or reverse image.

Type Twister

A program from Aldus Corporation that creates many different type effects such as shadowing, adding colors, and bending and twisting type.

typeahead

A feature of some programs that stores characters in a buffer as they are being typed, before displaying them on the screen.

typeahead buffer

A buffer storage that temporarily holds characters as they are being typed, before displaying them on the computer screen, in a program that has the typeahead feature.

typeface

The style or design of a set of characters. Examples of typefaces are Times Roman, Helvetica, and Avant Garde.

typeface family

A group of related typefaces that are variations on the same design, such as Schoolbook, Schoolbook bold, Schoolbook italic, Schoolbook bold italic.

typefounder

Someone who designs and produces typefaces; originally referred to a producer of metal type which was set by hand.

typematic

A keyboard feature that makes a kkkkkkeeeeeeyyyyyyyy repeat typing as long as it is pressed down.

typematic rate

The speed at which a character is repeated when its key is held down.

typeover mode

A typing mode in which the characters typed in replace, or type over, existing text. See insert mode.

typescript

A typewritten manuscript.

typeset

To set in type; compose.

typesetter

1. A person who keys in text to be printed and styles it according to specifications. 2. A machine used for setting type. Before the advent of desktop publishing, typesetting was done only on special typesetting machines.

typesetting

Setting material in type by hand, by means of a phototypesetter, or on a computer.

typesize

The size of type, usually given in points. Book text normally is 10, 11, or 12 point type; headings may be 14 to 18 point; chapter titles may be 20 to 36 point; footnotes may be 8 point.

typewrite

To type.

typewriter

1. A machine used to print characters on a page by striking keys on a keyboard which then strike a ribbon to make ink or carbon impressions on paper. 2. A person who types on a typewriter.

typewriting

1. Using a typewriter to set characters on a page. 2. Writing produced using a typewriter.

typewritten

Typed.

typing

1. Using a typewriter or computer keyboard to input data. 2. In programming, the classification of variables by the kind of data they contain, such as a character string, integer, etc.

typist

Someone who types on a typewriter or computer keyboard.

typo

Abbreviated expression for typographical error. A mistake in keyboarding; not hitting the intended key.

typographer

1. A printer or compositor. 2. Someone who specializes in working with type artistically, producing material that is visually appealing by choosing the appropriate styles and sizes of type and arranging the typed matter attractively on a page or other medium.

typographic

Relating to typography or typesetting.

typographical error

An error in keyboarding; not an error of content or style, simply an error caused by accidentally hitting the wrong key.

typography

1. The process of setting type by hand to produce printed material. 2. The style, placement, and overall appearance of typeset material. 3. The art of choosing and combining designs, styles, and sizes of type and arranging the typed matter to create an attractive layout.

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