DeepSec 2009 In-Depth Security Conference is dedicated to Espionage

The global financial crisis has driven some companies into the arms of espionage. “Stealing products is a lot easier than doing research” warns Rene Pfeiffer, organiser of the third international in-depth security conference DeepSec, which is taking place from 17 to 20 November 2009 in Vienna. “Industrial espionage is getting a bigger problem” says Pfeiffer. VIENNA, AUSTRIA, September 17, 2009 /24-7PressRelease/ — The global financial crisis has driven some companies into the arms of espionage. "Stealing products is a lot easier than doing research" warns Rene Pfeiffer, organiser of the third international in-depth security conference DeepSec, which is taking place from 17 to 20 November 2009 in Vienna. "Industrial espionage is getting a bigger problem" says Pfeiffer. Most enterprises and organisations make a grave mistake when facing a crisis: "A lot of them turn their attention to saving resources and money, but this is the moment hackers with bad intentions are waiting for." explains the security expert.

For this reason the DeepSec 2009 conference has a strong focus on the topic of espionage, apart from anything related to security. The conference is taking place for the third time and assembles elite experts from all over the world in Vienna. David Burgess addresses the security of GSM communication between the network’s base stations and cell phones. He managed to create his own GSM network at the Burning Man festival in Nevada. This enables attackers to capture cell phones in their own networks if deployed correctly. Another presentation also exploits wireless data connections. Thorsten Schr? introduces the tool Keykeriki that can intercept the keys pressed on a wireless keyboard.

High tech is not the only way for attackers to get nearer to their goals. Sharon Conheady and Martin Law of First Defence Information Security will deal with the weakest link in their workshop about "Social Engineering". Unsuspecting persons can easily fall victim to social manipulation and may give away useful information to complete strangers.

Anyone defending servers with the latest products from the network security market should also think of using the proper locks for the hardware. Deviant Ollam and Babak Javadi (TOOOL.us) will tackle the topic "Physical Security" in their two-day workshop. Their knowledge only begins with locks and covers the whole spectrum up to electronic locks, doors and windows.

Pfeiffer intends to resolve a common misunderstanding: "The term hacker does not apply solely to criminals. Most of them just want to point out security risks so that these holes can be plugged for everyone’s own good."

The DeepSec conference aims to bring the world’s most renowned security professionals from academics, government, industry, and the underground hacking community together. Everyone is invited to share experiences and collaborate. "We are a neutral platform and try to build a bridge between research, business, government agencies and the hacker community." explains Pfeiffer.

The schedule offers more topics such as electronic voting, risks of #Twitter, cloud computing, attacks on databases, exploitation of smart cards, malicious USB drivers, risks through manipulated printer firmware, simulations of large scale networks under attack and lots of helpful insights into secure software development and deployment.

The schedule can be found here: https://deepsec.net/schedule
The online registration can be found here: https://deepsec.net/register/

The DeepSec IDSC is an annual European two-day in-depth conference on computer, network, and application security. The conference aims to bring together the leading security experts from all over the world in Europe.


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