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Deloitte Analysis of Top Technology Trends for 2011

NEW YORK Jan. 20, 2011

Eric Openshaw

Among Deloitte’s top forecasted technology trends for 2011, highlights include:

More than half of all computers aren’t computers anymore

In 2011, more than 50 percent of computing devices sold globally will be smartphones, tablets and non-PC netbooks, breaking the PC’s decades-long market dominance. Unlike the 2009 netbook phenomenon, where buyers chose machines that were essentially less powerful versions of traditional PCs, the 2011 computing market will be dominated by devices that use different processing chips and operating systems than those used for PCs over the past 30 years. This shift represents a tipping point as we move from a world of mostly standardized PC-like devices to a far more heterogeneous environment.

Tablets in the enterprise: more than just a toy

In 2011, enterprises will purchase more than 25 percent of all tablet computers, a figure that is likely to increase in 2012 and beyond. Although some commentators view tablets as underpowered media-consumption toys suitable only for consumers, more than 10 million of these devices will likely be purchased by enterprises in 2011. Consumer demand for tablets is expected to remain strong; however, enterprise demand is likely to grow even faster, although from a lower base.

Operating system diversity: no standard emerges on the smartphone or tablet

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Online regulation ratchets up, but cookies live on

Media criticism of online privacy will continue in 2011; however, legislative and regulatory changes that impact the way websites gather, share, and exploit user information will be minor. Cookies, which are the small files of personal information that websites create on a visitor’s computer, are very likely to remain core to the online user experience. While new online privacy legislation is expected to be modest, the online industry will likely become far more proactive when tackling privacy issues — expanding their efforts to influence legislation and increasing their level of self-regulation with the goal of avoiding new legislation altogether.

Note to Editors

Anisha Sharma [email protected] http://www.deloitte.com/us/techpredictions2011

www.deloitte.com/us/about

Anisha Sharma

Virginia Chaves

Public Relations

Hill & Knowlton

Deloitte

+1 212 885 0530

+1 212 492 4427

[email protected]

[email protected]

SOURCE Deloitte

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