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Detroit Electronic Expo

Usually, ComputerUser features profiles with company executives who, for lack of a better word, are real. But what’s the point of having so much technology around us if we can’t create a few interesting people every once in a while?

Usually, ComputerUser features profiles with company executives who, for lack of a better word, are real. But what’s the point of having so much technology around us if we can’t create a few interesting people every once in a while? Toward that end, meet Blue. She’s a computer-generated spokesperson for the Detroit Electronic Expo, a funky show in mid-November that throws together technology, fashion, electronic music, and entertainment. Here, Blue takes a break from her rigorous show promotion duties to chat about Prince, color coding, and why she’s not a Sim.

What is it like to be Blue?

Since my conception in 2001, my life has been pretty eventful. I have gone through many changes to eventually become the perfection you see before you. Seriously, it’s both fun and exciting.

Why “Blue”? Why not Green or Yellow?

I suppose it has a lot to do with the many technological references to the color blue in the past. From IBM’s Big Blue to Apple’s bluish interfaces to Prince’s song “Computer Blue,” and so on. It may also have to do with what the color blue can represent: intelligence, sensuality, warmth, a sense of coolness. Though I think it simply has something to do with my blue eyes, hair, and lipstick.

Why is there a need for what you do?

There is sometimes a need for a face that the public can relate to and connect with, and that’s me. I’m the virtual embodiment of the creative collective that is behind Detroit entertainment and the Detroit Electronic Expo. If you are asking why a virtual person as opposed to a real one, well, what better way is there to represent an innovative event of technology and entertainment?

What exactly do you do anyway?

Generally, I provide the creative teams a royal pain in the bytes by being very high-maintenance, as my programming can be quite demanding. Seriously, I will be hosting the tech-accessorized fashion shows at DEX as well as introducing each of the staged festivities. I first began as an interactive guide for the Detroit Entertainment CD mediazine, but my programming became too large to fit alongside the rest of the video and Flash content. There will be a role for me in the upcoming television show, DETV, which will be showcased at DEX, but to what extent is hush-hush for now.

What do you want for yourself in the future?

I would love to have the ability to interact with people directly in the real world. By this, I don’t mean in the “Pinocchio/Blue Fairy” sense of becoming “real,” but more in the form of combining my programming with real-time motion sensing system to be able to communicate with the public one-on-one at future DEX and DETV events.

Life seems fairly perfect in the digital world. Are there any downsides to being virtual?

The main challenge I face is to overcome the general stereotypes of virtual persons past and present. When people think of “virtuals,” they normally think of the buffoonery of Max Headroom or those amusing and cute Sims. I take my role seriously and wish to change these perceptions so I may be viewed professionally as a spokesperson, host and a person in general. Another challenge is the inability to leave the confines of my screen. Blue Fairy… are you out there?

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