Computeruser.com
Latest News

NASA Tests GPS Monitoring System for Big U.S. Earthquakes

WASHINGTON April 24, 2012 United States

http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO

California Oregon Washington

Craig Dobson Washington Pacific Pacific

Accurate and rapid identification of earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 and stronger is critical for disaster response and mitigation efforts, especially for tsunamis. Calculating the strength of a tsunami requires detailed knowledge of the size of the earthquake and associated ground movements. Acquiring this type of data for very large earthquakes is a challenge for traditional seismological instruments that measure ground shaking.

High-precision, second-by-second measurements of ground displacements using GPS have been shown to reduce the time needed to characterize large earthquakes and to increase the accuracy of subsequent tsunami predictions. After the capabilities of the network have been fully demonstrated, it is intended to be used by appropriate natural hazard monitoring agencies. USGS and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are responsible for detecting and issuing warnings on earthquakes and tsunamis, respectively.

Yehuda Bock La Jolla, Calif.

Scripps University of California in San Diego Central Washington University Ellensburg University of Nevada in Reno California Institute of Technology Pasadena Boulder, Colo. University of California at Berkeley

NASA, NSF, USGS, and other federal, state, and local partners support the GPS stations in the network, including the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, the Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array, the Bay Area Regional Deformation Array and the California Real-Time Network.

United States Frank Webb

The READI network is the outgrowth of nearly 25 years of U.S. government research efforts to develop the capabilities and applications of GPS technology. The GPS satellite system was created by the Department of Defense for military and ultimately civil positioning needs. NASA leveraged this investment by supporting development of a global GPS signal receiving network to improve the accuracy and utility of GPS positioning information. Today that capability provides real-time, pinpoint positioning and timing for a wide variety of uses from agriculture to Earth exploration.

Timothy Melbourne Central Washington University

Sumatra Geoffrey Blewitt University of Nevada in Reno

http://www.nasa.gov

SOURCE NASA

Leave a comment

seks shop - izolasyon
basic theory test book basic theory test