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Online Evidence Can Be Damaging in Divorce Court

More than ever, the Internet is serving as a place where busy people interact with their friends and family and even meet new people. The Internet is also becoming a place where legal evidence is gathered, to be used in divorces and even criminal trials. August 20, 2009 /24-7PressRelease/ — Online Evidence Can Be Damaging in Divorce Court

Article provided by Law Offices of Scott David Stewart
 Visit us at http://www.sdsfamilylaw.com

More than ever, the Internet is serving as a place where busy people interact with their friends and family and even meet new people. The Internet is also becoming a place where legal evidence is gathered, to be used in divorces and even criminal trials.

As more people use social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter, investigators, attorneys and others are uncovering incriminating evidence that can wind up in courtrooms. Legal experts say divorcing people too often post comments, photos and videos that can be damaging when presented in court.

Specialists in Internet security say many users don’t give enough thought to what they post online. They say users should not put anything on a blog, social networking page, Web site or e-mail that they wouldn’t want publicly aired on the front page of their local newspaper — or in court.

Damage caused by posting self-incriminating evidence can be especially painful in divorce cases in which custody of a child is at stake. Examples of this evidence include indiscreet comments about an affair, a cell phone video of a girlfriend or boyfriend, photos of partying, and harsh criticisms of a soon-to-be-former spouse. All of this and more can potentially be used to harm a case in the eyes of a judge.

Experts say nothing posted online is truly private. They advise that you keep intimate or potentially damaging information private by keeping it off of the Internet altogether. Many divorce attorneys and investigators now routinely examine the contents of social network pages of clients and their spouses.

They’re not the only ones examining social sites for legal evidence. Law enforcement officials and potential employers are also increasingly turning to Facebook, LinkedIn and other sites for valuable information.

Ultimately, if you want information to remain private, don’t put it at risk by putting it on the Internet.

Article provided by Law Offices of Scott David Stewart
 Visit us at http://www.sdsfamilylaw.com


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